Close

No products in the cart.

How to Dye EGRET Organic Merino Yarn Neon Yellow

By Gina Rockenwagner on December 21, 2020

Dye Yarn Neon Yellow

Winter is a hard time for color lovers. Wardrobes turn dark and drab along with the landscape. Daylight dwindles. I start to wonder whether my coat has become a second skin!

One easy way to fight the winter doldrums is with bright knit accessories! A festive hat or scarf in an unexpected shade adds a delightful pop of color to an otherwise neutral winter outfit. Luckily for us dyers, KNOMAD has so many beautiful bare yarn options perfect for next to skin wear. One of my favorites is a glowy single-ply yarn called EGRET. Spun from super soft organic merino wool, EGRET is a fingering weight, which means finding a pattern for this yarn is a piece of cake! And have I mentioned how soft it is? This light and airy yarn is a delight to wear.

I’m dyeing up a single skein of EGRET in a highlighter yellow shade. I plan to make a cute beanie with these 437 yards, and I think I can get away with it! Can you help me out by recommending a pattern in the comments? 

In the meantime, learn how to dye the yarn for this bright topper below!

 

MATERIALS

  • 1 skein of Knomad EGRET yarn – 100%  Fine Organic Merino Wool. We designed this project for EGRET but it would also work well on any of our super soft yarns like SPARK, SALCANTAY, MAGNOLIA, and SANDSTONE.
  • Dharma Trading co dye for silk and wool. This color is Fluorescent Lemon
  • Gram scale
  • A cup to mix the dye in
  • Citric acid powder
  • Metal chafing pan at least 3 inches deep, or a metal pot you don’t use for food
  • A measuring spoon. Any size will work.
  • Your regular set up for heat setting yarn
  • Optional: a zip tie

 

SOAK THE YARN

Loop a zip tie around each skein of yarn, if you are using them. Soak the yarn in lukewarm water with a dash of citric acid for about 1 hour.

 

MIX AND MEASURE THE DYE

Make sure to always protect yourself with gloves and a respirator whenever you work with dye in its powder form. A dust mask is not enough protection to safely work with dye powder! You should keep your own set of tools for dyeing. These tools should never be used to prepare or serve food.

Use the gram scale to weigh out the dye and citric acid in a cup. I used .5 grams of dye and .5 grams of citric acid powder for each skein of yarn. Add hot water to the cup and use the spoon to mix the whole thing together.

 

DYE THE YARN

Remove the skein from the soaking liquid, gently squeezing the excess liquid out of the yarn. Place the skein in the pan, pressing it down and spreading out the yarn so as much surface area as possible is exposed to the dye. Add 6 cups of the soaking liquid to the pan, or just enough to barely cover the yarn.

Dye Yarn Neon Yellow

Sprinkle the dye mix over the yarn. Use your hands and/or the back of a spoon to work the dye into the yarn. Make sure to wear gloves when you do this!

Cover the pan and heat the yarn for 15 minutes.

Dye Yarn Neon Yellow

RINSE AND DRY

Allow the yarn to cool completely.

Rinse and dry the yarn as you normally would. Enjoy your finished yarn! Make sure to tag us using #Knomadyarn so we can see all your fabulous projects.

Dye Yarn Neon Yellow

 

Dye Yarn Neon Yellow

 

Share:

Gina Rockenwagner

Gina Fama Röckenwagner (she/her) is a color-obsessed knit designer and textile artist based in Los Angeles, California. Her work has been featured in Vogue Knitting, Pom Pom Quarterly, and Purl Soho’s eponymous blog. She founded her line of soft, comfortable, and size-inclusive clothing, SOFT HAUS, in 2015. When not working on yarn-related endeavors, Gina can be found quilting, biking, baking and watching trashy tv with her cats, Paloma and Blooper.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


We know fibre, you know dye; that makes us a pretty good team. We’re specialists in worldly natural fibres, blending them for just the right balance of strength, softness, and elasticity. We have a quality yarn for every creative journey you wish to embark on.

But when it comes to color, you’re the expert (we’re just here to marvel).

Sign up for our newsletter today and be the first to know when we publish a new blog post.

natural dyes for wool

Natural Dyes for Wool: Acorns + Iron

As an amateur, experimental natural dyer, I love playing with the potential colors that …
READ MORE
SUPERWASH VS NON SUPERWASH WOOL

Superwash vs Non Superwash Wool: Conventional Acid Dyes

“What is the difference between superwash and non superwash wool?” is a question we …
READ MORE
Multicolor yarn

Color pooling

Multicolor yarn is so fun to work with and relatively easy to achieve. One of …
READ MORE
Turmeric Dye

Step by Step Turmeric Dye

Turmeric is a bright golden spice that you can find in most grocery stores. It …
READ MORE
X