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How to dye speckles with Egret bare yarn

By Gina Rockenwagner on May 11, 2020

At first glance, our Egret yarn is as simple as can be. This 100% merino yarn is a single ply in a fingering weight, with a slight glow, like morning fog. But our Egret bare yarn is more than meets the eye!

undyed yarn egret

 

Light and soft as a cloud, the fine merino wool used to make this yarn has an unparalleled softness. It is also organic, making it as gentle on the ecosystem as it is on your skin. As it turns out, this simple yarn is quite extraordinary!

Egret yarn is a perfect choice for many types of projects including garments, accessories, and even socks. With many patterns for fingering weight yarn available online, you won’t have a hard time getting inspired to use Egret undyed yarn.

We took Egret for a whirl and used it to dye a fun speckle yarn. Keep reading for our simple how-to instructions.

speckle yarn

After soaking the yarn in a tub of water with a spoonful of citric acid, transfer the yarn to a pot or pan. 

mix some powder dye

Mix some powder dye with an equal amount of citric acid and then add water to dissolve the dye and citric acid. This color is fluorescent fuchsia from Dharma Trading Company. Turn the heat on the yarn on low. Use a spoon or dropper to sprinkle small drops of dye all over the yarn. Heat set, rinse and dry the yarn as you usually would.

mixed powder yarn

 

Share your Egret creations using #knomadyarn

 

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Gina Rockenwagner

Gina Fama Röckenwagner (she/her) is a color-obsessed knit designer and textile artist based in Los Angeles, California. Her work has been featured in Vogue Knitting, Pom Pom Quarterly, and Purl Soho’s eponymous blog. She founded her line of soft, comfortable, and size-inclusive clothing, SOFT HAUS, in 2015. When not working on yarn-related endeavors, Gina can be found quilting, biking, baking and watching trashy tv with her cats, Paloma and Blooper.

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